Wednesday, March 7, 2012

a dubious welcome


As a returning resident to Canada you need a place where the government can send your mail. If you want to get that mail you have to be in residence. You may remember that as a Catch-22 and it was the deal we faced in the summer of 2010. Ready or not, it was time to go and we needed a place to live by September 1st.

We could have flown here from Portland, OR to find an apartment but that would have been very expensive and, besides, it would have been a holiday and nobody is ever completely rational while on vacation. So we did what modern people do and googled for a decent place in an area of Halifax that looked reasonable for people who enjoy walking.

Eventually, we found Parthenon Properties*, a management company that had pictures of very nice apartments in modern buildings, and we decided to rent a 17th floor place at their newly renovated Slabhurst Tower**. The rent was higher than what were paying for our urban townhouse and the only appliances were a fridge and stove, meaning we'd have to do without the garbage disposal, microwave, dishwasher, and the washer and dryer we'd grown used to having. Parking was going to be extra as well. We figured we'd cope for a year while we looked for something nicer.

When the lease arrived in the mail we were surprised to see six extra pages listing all the items associated with our new apartment whose cost we'd have to cover if they were damaged. It was stated we'd lose our deposit for normal cleaning costs at the end of our tenancy but would be billed for the items listed:

nail hole in wall - $10 each up to 1/4 inch to replaster - landlord's discretion for repair charge for larger holes
gouge in hardwood floor - $200 per room to re-sand and polish
scratch on kitchen counter - $50 - $250
drip plates for stove - $15
broken switch plate - $25
broken light fixture - $50 - $150
cracked bathroom tile - $15
toilet seat - $50

and so forth but I'm sure you get the idea. It seemed strange but we weren't too worried as we'd never broken any of those things so I filled out the forms and sent the money - deposit and 12 post dated rent checks plus one more to guarantee a secure parking space for a year.

A few days before the end of August, when we'd finished giving away everything we weren't taking, when we'd packed and sealed our inventoried boxes, when the movers had come to pack the rest and had driven it away, we carried our bags to the car and left. One day I may write about the 4000 mile journey but not today. The moving company had given us an estimate between 10 and 30 days for delivery to our new place and, since we had to be there to sign our belongings through Customs, we didn't have time to delay. We made decent time but it was a long trip so by the time we arrived in Halifax it was already September 5th, Labor Day.


We knew the management offices would be closed but they'd promised to leave the keys to our apartment with the maintenance staff and since we were very excited to see our new home we went there straight away. After staying in hotels for 7 nights,  packing up to leave early every morning, we didn't mind that even though we had no furniture we'd have our own floor to sleep on and a 17th floor view of the Atlantic Ocean.

What we hadn't reckoned with, indeed hadn't understood at all, was that Halifax is a college town. It turns out there are 5 universities here with more than 30,000 students in need of housing every September. When we arrived at Slabhurst Tower it appeared that half that number were lining up for the elevators along with their belongings. Chaos barely describes the scene in the lobby.

Not knowing what else to do we went off to look for someone who could show us our new place. Following signs marked 'Maintenance' and 'Boiler Room' we opened doors and walked along corridors until we found a grungy little office with a very harassed man sitting at an untidy desk. After we told him who we were he dug through a great stack of papers, pulled out a file and told us to follow him.. back to the lobby where he eventually commandeered an elevator.


What more can I tell you about the apartment he showed us that the picture doesn't say? Besides the gouges in the floors, the holes in the walls, and the oven door all atwist, we gazed in shock at the glass balcony doors 6 inches beyond which was a jersey barrier and the whole thing, from floor to ceiling, enclosed by an impenetrable chain link fence. This was my Atlantic Ocean view?

The maintenance man was definitely having a busy day but even he was shocked at the condition of the apartment as he asked us if we'd like to sign the documents and take the keys or would we prefer to see the building manager the next morning. Remembering the six page itemized list, we told him to keep the keys.

Once outside in the safety of our car we started to giggle, and as we each remembered another horror the other might have missed we laughed all the harder. Finally, after wiping our eyes and blowing our noses, we went off to find a hotel and a place to have a stiff drink. Neither of us had consumed so much as a glass of beer for a decade but the occasion seemed to warrant a palliative.

An hour or two later we sat at an outdoor pub picking at french fries and sipping our glasses of Unibroue La Terrible, a beer we'd chosen for the appropriateness of its name rather than its taste, as we strategized about our meeting the next day. Surely, we imagined, the management would be as disgusted as we were over the state of the apartment and would be eager to offer reparations. Maybe they'd offer us an undamaged place. It wasn't in our best interest to not take the apartment because it had become our official Canadian address but we couldn't live in the dungeon we'd seen. We decided to see what they'd say.

Shortly after 8am the next day we were back in the lobby of Slabhurst Tower, but this time a heavy wooden door that had been locked the previous afternoon was open. We stepped from a tiled floor onto a lush gray carpet where we found ourselves in a wide hall hung with subtly lit artwork. At the far end was a grand lobby dominated by a tall reception desk whose mahogany curves were highlighted by a magnificent chandelier. The bored receptionist pointed us toward a nearby seating area where we were to wait for the busy manager. It wasn't difficult to see where the renovation money had been spent.

Looking distinctly uncomfortable about meeting us, we sat watching as the manager buzzed in and out of her glass fronted office holding muted conversations with various men in suits while pointedly ignoring our presence. Twenty minutes passed before she gave a deep sigh in our direction and told us to follow her.


Once we were all seated she opened our file and asked if we were ready to take charge of the apartment we'd rented:
'No, not in the condition it was in yesterday afternoon.'
We fixed that.
'It's impossible you fixed it since then.'
Well, we might have to do a little more later but it's ready now. Sign this and take the key.
'No, we want a place that looks like the one you advertised.'

Hearing that, she got up and left the room. A few minutes later one of the suited men entered followed by the manager and a security guard pushing a big executive chair. The man sat down in the big chair, the manager sat in her small executive chair, and the security guard leaned against the wall behind us with his arms crossed.

We spent the next ten minutes listening to a senior vice president of Parthenon Properties alternately cajole and threaten us with lawsuits. Needless to say nothing he said changed our minds. In a sense it was bizarrely amusing to watch as he shook and turned colors on his way to becoming apoplectic. That was when we got up and left.

A little later that day we asked a lawyer if we could be sued for not accepting the apartment. His only question was, 'Did you accept the keys?' When we told him 'No' he said that had been the right thing to do. Of course, we lost the deposit, the first month's rent, and a year's worth of secure parking, but the relief we felt at not having to live at Slabhurst Tower almost made up for that.

A few days later we rented another apartment and proceeded to notify everyone about our new new address. We'd found yet another temporary home.


*name changed to preserve us from lawsuit
** as above but with thanks to Randal Graves

27 comments:

  1. What a horrific welcome to Halifax! The nerve of those managers AND the security guard. Makes me wonder how many times the guard has had to escort reasonably irate almost-tenants out of the building.

    As Betty Davis said in one of her movies, "What a dump!"

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    1. I have the feeling a few parents of freshmen might well have reacted that way too. The kids moving in seemed to be having a good time but being away from home in the early years they're ready for anything. We also heard the chain link was on the balconies to prevent a recurrence of accidents.

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  2. How awful! I know you'd hinted at something on your blog back then, but this is horrendous! Good thing you didn't get caught up in that con though you did lose money. How do these people get away with this?!

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    1. You remembered :-) We'd figured renting at that distance from what seemed to be a reputable company would prevent that kind of occurrence. My camera might have provided proof but it was in the car that afternoon. We'd probably have been better off using craigslist.

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  3. Bloody hell Susan. You were sold a pig in a poke with that apartment.Clearly the landlords don't give a damn about keep premises in godorder

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    1. They were trying to keep the building fully occupied. That's considered by many to be good business practice these days.

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  4. Such a marvelous write to describe a truly miserable situation. You were right in that no words were needed with that drawing depicting the despicable apartment. My god, this could be turned into a play (I am absolutely seeing it on stage). I remember your writing a bit about disappointment and getting a "new new address" but had not realized that you two endured this kind of shock and mistreatment. It was a terrible homecoming, actually. You impress me for having made the best of it, as I recall an early post with wonderful photos taken on one of your first walks around the neighborhood. You are amazing, Susan.

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    1. As a play it would definitely be a tragi-comedy. All we could do once we'd come so far was to deal with the problem as I'm quite sure you would have done in our place. Exploring is always a good way to take your mind off your problems, isn't it?

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    2. Yes. It sure is!

      We're heading over to the coast Sat. afternoon with Bonbon to get her paws on the sand (bad weather expected but oh well). I will say hello to Lincoln City and Depoe Bay for you. :)

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  5. That was certainly a horrid "welcome home to Canada"! I cannot believe you had to go through all that. Actually — I can believe it. Some property management companies are really ruthless. And it was a dump.

    But you certainly made the best of a bad situation. Especially by not taking the keys. And you tell, and show, the story so delightfully. Better than I could ever have done.

    Glad you were able to get a place you wanted and the address you needed. And that you're still surviving a year and a half later.

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    1. From what I've seen Canadian cities are very big on property management companies no matter where you go. We're still looking for just the right place but I shudder whenever I look at a website that asks 'what city do do you want to live in?'

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  6. Susan, I must add that your drawings are amazing - you hardly need words here. I've said it before, you could illustrate books. The tower made me laugh, capturing exactly why I dislike highrises.

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    1. The funny thing about drawing these was noticing the anger that appeared in the lines as I drew them long after I'd thought I was over it. Sometimes I wonder if what I've been doing is writing an online book.

      The thing about the towers is that you don't want to live in one or in the shadow of one.

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  7. i'm with Jams O'

    Bloody hell!! (which, coincidentally is my expletive of choice - been using it a lot lately)

    Yes, you alluded to this back then, with your usual grace.... but, Oi! So you went from a chain link fenced balcony to a balcony sprouting hydraulic hammers for most of the summer. But the repairs were, at least, temporary in the new digs. May you have ample opportunity to use that balcony now that the repairs are finished.

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    1. Bloody hell sounds just about right - my Dad's favorite expletive too.

      Yes, we got this place just after the management discovered the tenants had moved without notice. They took pity on us (and made sure we could afford the rent of course) but only had time to paint and clean the carpets. Then we lived with the balcony repair crews working until December every day but the stormiest. Unfortunately, the balcony is behind an old fashioned door with a small window and because of the wind and the sun baking it all day it's not very suitable for a garden. A place closer to the ground would be better.

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  8. I like the part where you both go eat dinner and laugh at the entire situation rather than let it get you down.

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    1. Never doubt we came close to tears at first but the sheer lunacy of the situation was beyond being taken seriously.

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  9. Are you *sure* the tectonic plates didn't shift and your car actually never left American soil? Horror, comedy, this has it all, and I feel guilty for laughing because it's not, but it is, you said so yourself.

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    1. Canada wasn't supposed to have changed in 33 years because I certainly haven't.

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  10. I know that building! Isn't it the tallest building in Halifax?

    The part I found most amusing is the security guard wheeling in the executive chair for the dude that was supposed to rake you over the coals and didn't succeed!

    :-)

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    1. Yes, supposedly the tallest building in Canada east of Toronto but it shall not be named :-)

      Some things you just can't make up.

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  11. crap-i am having the hardest time leaving you a comment here...i have been hanging for 20 minutes, refreshed the page at least three times and now, using the wordpress identity isn't good enough for google and they bounced me back and i lost the comment i left originally....sometimes i am so sick of all this internet stuff, excepting friends like yourself, i would be OFFLINE FOREVER!!!

    your drawings are wonderful and i really laughed at that building-it's the tallest building in all of the kingdom of canada...i cannot again type all my lost comment just now...dog is farting terribly and is needing a go outside...in my previous waiting, we went out, had a bowl of cereal AND came back a few times with dog in tow to see if it was back yet.. hell bad day all around. glad you are n ow safely inhabiting a decent home-i do see you back in the states...i don't know why but don't think this is more than a very extended and expensive vacation? hope not or maybe not... ;) xoxoxo

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    1. I too find it more difficult to keep up regular posting these days mostly because I've inadvertently sailed into some Sargasso Sea. I'm happy you kept at it until you were able to safely leave a comment and I'm very glad you like the drawings. You are a very sweet companion and friend.

      As for whether we'll stay or not only time will tell.
      much love
      xoxo

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  12. I'm glad I finally got a chance to read this! I knew your move to Halifax had its "adventures," but the details and drawings tell the full story beautifully. Even if it is the kind of story that makes me want to pinch the head off those bullies and liars.

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  13. I'm glad you got to see it - a story I had to tell in spite of it's being a bit too long. I'd be happy to help with the head pinching.

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  14. How shocking and how familiar. The world has more than it's proper share of bullies. But we are primates, and some never seem to get much further than the posturing, chest thumping and rear-end displays.

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    1. Hi Steve, nice to see you. Yes, this was definitely a prime example in microcosm of much of what's wrong about our larger reality.

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